Casing

The dial and hands are added using a movement holder with a central support with a small tweak made to the minute hand to bring it parallel to the dial.  The movement is re-fitted to this holder so that it can be tested again.

Omega Seamaster 30 repair and service - dial and hands added

Once the performance check is complete, the case parts are ultrasonically cleaned and then, the movement is re-fitted to the case.

Omega Seamaster 30 repair and service - movement cased

A new case back seal is fitted and the case is closed.  This customer did not want a new crown and so, the water resistance is compromised as the crown seal has deteriorated.  This has been pointed out and it is expected that this customer, who is used to vintage watches, will exercise the necessary care.

Omega Seamaster 30 repair and service - case closed

The strap is cleaned/fed with leather care balm and then re-attached so the watch is finished and it goes into final test.  It’s been checked and set up now so, it’s unusual for the final testing to show any odd results but the details are listed below.

Omega Seamaster 30 repair and service - finished

To simulate typical usage and how the watch will run in the real world. I use this for this manual wind:
Day 1: Full wind, set time, mounted on the auto test machine (12 hours per day) – rested Dial up.
Day 2: Full wind, auto test machine (12 hours per day) – rested Dial up.
Day 3: Full wind, auto test machine (12 hours per day) – rested Dial up.
Day 4: Full wind, auto test machine (12 hours per day) – rested Dial up.
Day 5: Full wind, auto test machine (12 hours per day) – rested Dial up.

The average rate over the auto tester first five days of the test is roughly how I would expect this watch to run on the wrist.

Day 6: Full wind, 24 hours rested in dial up position (typical wear position).
Day 7: Full wind, 24 hours rested in dial down position (atypical wear position).
Day 8: Full wind, 24 hours rested in 9H position (typical wear position).
Day 9: Full wind, 24 hours rested in 6H position (typical wear position).
Day 10: Full wind, 24 hours rested in 3H position (atypical wear position).
Day 11: Full wind, 24 hours rested in 12H position (atypical wear position).

These six days just confirm that the watch  runs well and accurately in all positions.

Day 12: Full wind, rested in dial up position to check power reserve.
Day 13: Rested in dial up position to check power reserve.
These two days are only to check the power reserve.

4 Comments

  1. Pam

    Thank you for such a detailed explanation of your working methods. You feature Omega watches, but I’m assuming you offer the same service for other brands?

    • Thanks. Yes, I also work on other brands so, please let me know via the contact form if you have a watch that requires attention. There are examples of other brands on this site but, they are in .pdf form so, not so easy to read. Regards, Chris

  2. John Terras

    My omega is also circa 1960 and is in stainless casing. Do you require a watch for a specific period to supply a quote for servicing and cleaning? Your description of the procedure involved in cleaning and servicing were most interesting and provided an excellent insight into the skills and experience necessary to carry out any and all issues encountered.Thank you so much for the detailed procedural steps, from John.

    • Hello John. Nice to hear from you and thanks for the kind words. I do a lot of 1950s and 1960s Omega watches and have a soft spot for these. I review a watch within a week of me receiving it and supply a small report, with pictures, showing what is required with a price. If you want me to look at your watch, send me a message using the contact form and we’ll work something out. Regards, Chris

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