Although nearly all of my work is on vintage wristwatches, I received this Smiths car clock from a well known Jaguar restorer.  I rebuild these as they have some interesting aspects and they were used in many British cars in the 1950s and 1960s.  As usual, this doesn’t run but the condition looks fair so I’d hope it will not have too many issues.

Smiths car clock CE1114 as received

The dial is dirty but should clean up.  As usual, the hands are stained, although it’s not particularly clear here, so will be re-painted.

Smiths car clock CE1114 as received dial

All parts are removed and cleaned, generally with the automatic Elma machine I use for watches but some parts are cleaned by hand.  This shows the underside of the balance before cleaning and there is grease on the central spring steel that will drive the clock and burning on the balance from electrical issues.

Smiths car clock CE1114 balance pre cleaning

After hand cleaning this is looking far better.

Smiths car clock CE1114 balance cleaned

These parts make up the balance and hairspring support.

Smiths car clock CE1114 balance parts

The balance jewels are oiled and the balance re-installed to check the hairspring and end shakes.

Smiths car clock CE1114 balance installed

The train consists of two additional parts and both are checked under the microscope for wear.

Smiths car clock CE1114 train detail

Then installed.

Smiths car clock CE1114 train installed

The electrical parts are cleaned by hand – of interest here is the pin where the sprung ring will pivot.  This supports the electrical connection that contacts the pin on the underside of the balance.

Smiths car clock CE1114 electrical parts

A microscope view of the pin shows it as scored and corroded but the ring will need to be free to pivot here for the clock to run well.

Smiths car clock CE1114 spring pivot before

It gets polished.

Smiths car clock CE1114 spring pivot polished

And the electrical connection which is dirty and covered with carbon deposits also need cleaning.

Smiths car clock CE1114 electrical pin

And looks much better.

Smiths car clock CE1114 electrical pin cleaned

Then the circuit can be installed.

Smiths car clock CE1114 electrical parts installed

The balance is replaced and the clock runs – there is some adjustment of the various parts to maximize the balance swing (amplitude) .

Smiths car clock CE1114 movement built

The dial side parts are added and the movement re-fitted to the case.

The cleaned dial is added.

Smiths car clock CE1114 cased with dial

The hands need painting and will be added later but the clock is now running and can be adjusted for approximate rate on the watch test machine.  This shows an average rate of +15.6 seconds/day.  The lines are nothing special but this is not a high quality timepiece and these results are fine here.

Smiths car clock CE1114 running

A more detailed explanation of a rebuild for these clocks is shown here.

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